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Where Will It Take You?

Works by Susan Solomon & Kimberly Tschida Petters

On display May 3 – May 27, 2022.

About the Exhibition

This collaborative show focuses on the art and works of two very different landscape artists. Although their work is distinct, their subjects and inspirations both have deep roots in the Midwest. 

Landscapes are a classic subject in the art world, and these artists made it their own with distinct styles. Modern, simplified shapes contrast beautifully with more literal representations of prairies, storms, and vast horizons. 

This exhibition was made possible by a grant from the Hanson Family Foundation.

About the Artists

Susan Solomon

Susan Solomon is a freelance painter based in the Twin Cities. Originally from Las Vegas, she was influenced by the bright sunsets to create bold colors in her work. She got a formal art education from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Arts, and she continued to become a longtime resident of Minnesota and appreciate the beautiful Midwest landscapes.

Her paintings emphasize the light in darkness often through landscapes, skies, prairies, fields and more. The Midwest changes dramatically over the seasons and between bright skies and storms. Although the weather is temporary, Solomon’s scenes leave a lasting impression in the memory the way a rain leaves a lasting impact on the soil. However, she also feels that “Literature is its own landscape and an endless source of inspiration”. This belief has encouraged her to collaborate with various writers to paint the feelings their stories evoke.

Kimberly Tschida Petters

Kimberly Tschida Petters is a contemporary landscape painter. With a background in Painting and Photography from the University of Minnesota, Petters work is influenced by the landscapes of the Midwest. You can see her work in galleries and shows across Minnesota and Wisconsin and private collections all over the United States. 

Her work focuses on the vastness and calmness of driving in the Midwest while also portraying the mystery and quiet beauty of rural landscapes. These images are ingrained in her memory. She takes simple shapes and forms to create these memories so prevalent to those who have ever enjoyed a ride through the Midwest.

A Sprinkle of Story Seeds

By Layl McDill

About the Exhibit

Using small found objects, polymer clay, her own sketches and more; Layl McDill creates both large and small scale artwork. This show in particular focuses on stories and the complexities or wonders within. Animals and people are hidden in every work, but they all come together to create a larger picture and meaning.

The exhibition has interactive elements of writing stories to display with the work and a scavenger hunt for all to participate in. Viewers are encouraged to look closely at every detail while still seeing the larger representations.

Once upon a time each of us was a little kid. Everything was nonsense. We tried to figure it out. We wondered about everything. We wondered what was in the cupboard, the drawers, and boxes. We wondered how the calculator worked, or the dishwasher or a watch. We wondered what our stuffed animals did at night. We wondered what all the symbols at on the top row of the keyboard were for. We wondered what it would be like to live in a tree, underwater or in outer space.
For me making my art helps me keep this magical doorway to wonderment open. I am drawn to imagery that sparks that feeling of unknown and mystery like cupboards, drawers or placing everyday objects (like a keyhole, a lollipop, a chair etc.) in an incongruent setting (a flower, a fountain, a fish etc.). I like to create metaphors such as “Just think How Books are Like Bird Houses”- are they? I leave you thinking they are but you get to come up with your own reasons why.

McDill on her artistic process

An artist talk will be held from 2-4pm on April 9th.

McDill will also be hosting a Polymer Clay Workshop from 10:30am – 12:30pm on April 30th.

This exhibition was made possible by a grant from the Hanson Family Foundation


About the Artist

Layl McDill

McDill is a mixed media artist based out of the Minneapolis, Minnesota area. She feels joy in her career because she gets to feel like she’s playing through her work. Her work not only makes people smile, but can also help people see the world in a different light. McDIll hopes to make art that “subtly reminds us of reality, yet makes us see the world in new ways.”

“Some people come to my work thinking it is great for children but I really make my work for adults. I make it for everyone that loves to revisit that feeling of wonderment, magic and mystery that we all had as kids.”

McDill

Visit her website at laylmcdill.com.


Clear Lake Earth Day Photo Show

The Clear Lake Arts Center is proud to present the second Clear Lake Earth Day Photo Show! The show has been created in partnership with Clear Lake Earth Day to celebrate to beauty of Clear Lake and the surrounding area. The show will be open from Tuesday, April 5th – Friday, April 29th in the Stanton Gallery.

Thank you to all who entered this year. We had a great array of submissions, and we encourage everyone to continue or start taking photos as a means to appreciate nature and our scenic area this Earth Day. Hopefully you keep Earth Day in mind all year round.

Remember to participate in all the Earth Day activities happening on and around April 22nd in the community.

Click on PDF below or use the download button to save to your computer.


View last year’s Show Here

Clear Lake Earth Day Photo Show 2021


North Iowa Student Art Exhibition

About the Exhibit

The North Iowa Student Art Exhibition welcomed schools from Cerro Gordo and the surrounding counties to enter their student’s visual artwork to be shown in our Hanson Gallery. Kindergarten through High School Seniors are represented by their artworks made in school over the past year.

We are honored and amazed to have so many wonderful artists in the region. Thank you to parents and guardians for encouraging your student to create art, and thank you to art instructors for supporting those students throughout the school year.

The Reception Open House will be on Saturday, March 26th from 10am – 4pm. This will be a great opportunity to visit with the artists, educators, and everyone who helped make this show possible.

This exhibition was made possible by a grant from the Hanson Family Foundation, Circle of Giving members Jan and Tom Lovell, and the students and staff of the schools represented.

Two Comets, Entangled

Alexis Beucler

About the exhibit

Alexis Beucler is an artist currently residing in Mason City, Iowa where she is the Visual Arts Instructor and Gallery Coordinator at North Iowa Area Community College. She was born and raised in Florida where she studied studio art and earned a BFA at Florida State University. She currently holds her MFA in Painting & Drawing from the University of Iowa with secondary focuses in Printmaking and Book Arts.

Alexis has featured work in more than thirty domestic exhibitions in Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Indiana, Michigan, and North Carolina. In the spring of 2019 she was invited to participate in the Grant Wood Public Art Residency where she learned best practice skills for murals and community based projects. Since then Alexis has created four murals each scaling more than 20 feet.

This exhibition was made possible by a grant from the Hanson Family Foundation and by Circle of Giving members Jan and Tom Lovell.

Alexis Beucler

is an artist currently residing in Mason City, Iowa where she is the Visual Arts Instructor and Gallery Coordinator at North Iowa Area Community College. She was born and raised in Florida where she studied studio art and earned a BFA at Florida State University. She currently holds her MFA in Painting & Drawing from the University of Iowa with secondary focuses in Printmaking and Book Arts.

Alexis has featured work in more than thirty domestic exhibitions in Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Indiana, Michigan, and North Carolina. In the spring of 2019 she was invited to participate in the Grant Wood Public Art Residency where she learned best practice skills for murals and community based projects. Since then Alexis has created four murals each scaling more than 20 feet.

Richard Leet: Seasons

Richard Leet is originally from Waterloo, Iowa. He attended the University of Northern Iowa and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree and Master of Arts degree. He also pursued graduate studies at the University of Iowa. After 7 years as an arts educator, He became the first director of the Charles H. MacNider Art Museum in Mason City, Iowa, retiring in 2001. He has been exhibiting since 1956 and has had over 67 solo exhibitions. In the fall of 2012, a retrospective exhibition was held titled, Painting the Wind, Chasing the Seasons: Richard Leet, A Retrospective Exhibition Spanning over Fifty Years of Creative Expression.

This exhibition was made possible by a grant from the Hanson Family Foundation and by Circle of Giving members Jan and Tom Lovell.

Gem Windows

The Clear Lake Art Center presents Gem Windows new glasswork by Tilda Brown Swanson. The exhibition opens Tuesday, November 9, and will be on view in the Hanson Gallery through Saturday, December 13. This exhibition was made possible through a grant from the Hanson Family Foundation and through a generous gift from Circle of Giving members Jane and Eric Fogg.

In this series, Tilda Brown Swanson works within traditional gothic rose window structures to explore a wide variety of images surrounded by greenery wanting to show the beauty coming out of and going beyond the traditional structures and surrounding them with growth.

Tilda said, “During the pandemic, I was drawn to gothic-style rose windows. Placed high and illuminated naturally, their structured and traditional beauty inspired and calmed me. As a person overcoming past trauma, I do not seek to display those experiences in my work. I do not want others to feel aspects of my past life. We all have enough heartache and grief, especially in the past year. Instead, I want to draw myself and others into the beauty of glass and find sanctuary and healing there. “

To create these fine art windows, layers of flat and powdered glass explores lighting, color, and moments of beauty seen in the natural world. For some of the repeated patterns, she designs and cuts her own stencils. She heats the layered glass 8-10 times over many weeks to build the imagery, color, and depth of a piece. Tilda also said, “ I love to work in glass because the color is it’s most vibrant with light shining through it. My designs become separate entities with their own distinctive look with each firing.”

Tilda Brown Swanson has been working in glass for over 30 years. Building on her two-year apprenticeship with Narcissus Quagliata and with Judith Schaechter, Stephen Paul Day, and Klaus Mojé in sessions at Pilchuck Glass School, she began fusing glass in 1994. Her work is in private and corporate collections in the US, UK, and Gibraltar.

In Place

This series of digital illustrations explores the tradition of vanitas still lifes; symbolic works of art containing mostly inanimate objects that represent the transient nature of life. Each image contains items pertaining to time, death, cleanliness, play, boredom, pleasure, chaos, monotony, history, and hope. As a result of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, I have become much more aware of my own mortality and the ephemeral nature of my surroundings. Utilizing the vanitas tradition, I filter this experience with the acceptance of change, contentment in stillness, and an urgency to find joy in the present.

Bethanie Irons earned a BFA in Art from the University of South Dakota and MFA in Art from the University of Missouri. Irons also earned a PhD in Art Education from the University of Missouri, with an emphasis on higher education and teaching with technology. She is currently an Assistant Professor and Program Chair of Communication Design at Stephens College in Columbia, Missouri.

For more of Bethanie’s work visit – bethanieirons.com

In Place was made possible through the generous grant from the Hanson Family Foundation.

Rooted

Rooted is an exhibition of cyanotypes by Jody Boyer and etchings by Keith D Buswell. These works will be on view in the Hanson and Stanton galleries from September 14 through October 9.

Rooted takes you on a journey through the microscopic view of the landscape to the collective nature of trees. Boyer’s work encourages an intimate view of the atmosphere, landscape, and place. While Buswell encourages us to think of community and connection through the trees and the ecology that helps them thrive.

Rooted was made possible through the generous support of Clear Lake Bank & Trust and the Hanson Family Foundation.

Jody Boyer is a visual artist and arts educator living and working in Western Iowa. She received her B.A. in Studio Arts from Reed College, her M.A. in Intermedia and Video Art from the University of Iowa. Her artwork has been shown in over 70 exhibitions across the country, including at the Des Moines Art Center, Urban Culture Project in Kansas City, and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts. She teaches studio art courses at the University of Nebraska at Omaha and visual arts at Norris Middle School. In 2016 she was selected Nebraska Outstanding Art Educator of the Year by the Nebraska Art Teachers Association. Most recently she was selected as part of the 2019 School of Art Leaders cohort of the National Art Education Association.

Keith Buswell graduated with a BFA in art University of Nebraska–Lincoln. He works with various printmaking processes such as screen-printing, intaglio, and mono printing and dabbles in drawing and multimedia. He currently is a member of Karen Kunc’s Constellation Studios where he creates his prints. His work has been shown in the United States, Egypt, Dubai, France, and Italy. Notably, Keith received the Perry Family Award in 2018 and second place in the 40 Under 40 Showcase in Annapolis, MD, and third place at the Under Pressure print show in Fort Collins, CO. Originally from Council Bluffs, Iowa, he currently lives in Lincoln with his husband Brad and his dog Max.

Wabi-Sabi: beauty of impermanence

On view in the Hanson Gallery through September 11

Wabi-Sabi is the Japanese term that describes the concept of something that is impermanent and imperfect can be a thing of beauty. It teaches us to accept the imperfections of life, and the natural cycles of renewal, growth, and decay.

What is now discarded and forgotten has stories to tell, and nature finds a way to grow, thrive, and reclaim itself upon a man-made environment that once intruded upon it. There is beauty in this decay, and a link to our collective past and ourselves.

The American landscape is filled with long-forgotten relics from past eras, forgotten and abandoned sitting along the side of the roads; relics symbolizing the passage of time, beautifully perfect in their worn imperfection.

Alexandra Buxbaum‘s work has appeared in a myriad of publications both nationally and internationally. She has exhibited in over 50 shows at galleries, cultural centers, and museums, and is co-founder of the International Center for Documentary Arts. Her photographs are in numerous private collections.

Wabi-Sabi was made possible through the generous support of Randy and Kathy Ingram and the Hanson Family Foundation.

Click here to see more of Alexandra’s work.

Photo info- Abandoned gas station along Historic Route 66, Santa Rosa, New Mexico